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Staying Safe Online

Virgin Money is fully supportive of the Take Five to stop fraud campaign which is  Led by UK Finance, and backed by Her Majesty’s Government, the campaign is being delivered with and through a range of partners in the UK payments industry, financial services firms, law enforcement agencies, telecommunication providers, commercial, public and third sector organisations.

 

Take Five is a national campaign that offers straight-forward and impartial advice to help everyone protect themselves from preventable financial fraud. This includes email deception and phone-based scams as well as online fraud – particularly where criminals impersonate trusted organisations.

Its all about taking time to -

  1. Stop: Taking a moment to stop and think before parting with your money or information could keep you safe.
  2. Challenge: Could it be fake? It’s ok to reject, refuse or ignore any requests. Only criminals will try to rush or panic you.
  3. Protect: Contact your bank immediately if you think you’ve fallen for a scam and report it to Action Fraud.

Take Five: Rules to keep you and your account safe and secure

  1. Never disclose security details, such as your PIN, full banking password or one time pass code to anyone even bank staff

    A genuine bank or organisation will never ask you for these in an email, on the phone or in writing. Before you share anything with anyone, stop. Then pause to consider what you’re being asked for and question why they need it. Unless you’re 100% sure who you’re talking to, don’t disclose any personal or financial details whatsoever.

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  2. Don't assume an email, text or phone call is authentic

    Just because someone knows your basic details (such as your name and address or even your mother’s maiden name), it doesn’t mean they are genuine. Be mindful of who you trust – criminals may try and trick you into their confidence by telling you that you’ve been a victim of fraud. Criminals often use this to draw you into the conversation, to scare you into acting and revealing security details. Remember, criminals can also make any telephone number appear on your phone handset so even if you recognise it or it seems authentic, do not use it as verification they are genuine.

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  3. Don’t be rushed – a genuine organisation won’t mind waiting

    Under no circumstances would a genuine bank or some other trusted organisation force you to make a financial transaction on the spot; they would never ask you to transfer money into another account for fraud reasons. Remember to stop and take time to carefully consider your actions. A genuine bank or some other trusted organisation won’t rush you or mind waiting if you want time to think.

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  4. Listen to your instincts – you know if something doesn’t feel right

    If something feels wrong then it is usually right to question it. Criminals may lull you into a false sense of security when you are out and about or rely on your defences being down when you’re in the comfort of your own home. They may appear trustworthy, but they may not be who they claim to be.

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  5. Stay in control – don’t panic and make a decision you’ll regret

    Have the confidence to refuse unusual requests for personal or financial information. It’s easy to feel embarrassed when faced with unexpected or complex conversations. But it’s okay to stop the discussion if you do not feel in control of it.

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Take Five: Rules to stay safe when shopping online

  1. Take Five before you buy. If you’re using a retailer for the first time, always take time to research them before you give them any of your details. Be prepared to ask questions before buying
  2. Trust your instincts – if an offer looks too good to believe then there is usually a catch. Be suspicious of prices that are too good to be true
  3. Be sure you know who you are dealing with. Always access the website you are planning to buy from by typing the address into your web browser, and be wary of clicking on links in unsolicited emails
  4. Look for the padlock symbol in the address bar. It’s a good indication that they’re reputable
  5. Only use retailers you trust, for example ones you know or have been recommended to you. If you’re buying an item made by a major brand, you can often find a list of authorised sellers on their official website

Report suspected fraud

If you suspect any fraud on your account(s) please get in touch with us straightaway.

Contact us

Learn about different types of fraud

Fraudsters will try many ways to gain access to your account or trick you into passing across valuable personal information.

Learn about different types of fraud 

Take Five Quiz

Think you know how to spot a scam?

Try the Take Five quiz link opens in a new window and see how you shape up!